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Aug 9, 2022
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48. Performance Management Expert

48. Performance Management Expert

Christy Pruitt-Haynes and Jeff explore the topic of continuous performance management. Christy heads the Performance Practice at the NeuroLeadership Institute. She and Jeff talk about the evolution of traditional performance management processes, and the definition of continuous performance management. They discuss how critical it is for managers to be properly trained in continuous performance management. Christy shares the best strategies for working with managers and employees that don’t have the skillset to give and receive feedback in a healthy way. Jeff and Christy talk about the makeup of quality one-to-one meetings, the downsides of numerical ratings, and how organizations can move away from them.

Transcript

Intro: Duration: (02:21)

Opening music jingle & sound effects

Jeff Hunt:

Hi, everyone, I'm Jeff Hunt, and this is the Human Capital podcast produced by GoalSpan. Today, my hope is to shed some light on a difficult topic that brings stress and anxiety to a lot of people, performance management, and specifically the performance review. Not only does it bring stress, but I would go as far as to say many managers and employees actually hate the process.

They might even call it the bane of their existence. The traditional performance review can be seen as a check-the-box event that's filled with anxiety, surprises, and stress. And yet organizations still spend billions on these traditionally broken processes with very little results. What if this outdated process could be replaced with experiences that are engaging, motivating, and I would even say inspiring to both managers and employees? You might be thinking, okay, Jeff, this is not possible, but I think my guest today will help provide a different perspective.

Christy Pruitt-Haines is an expert in continuous performance management. She is a TEDx and keynote speaker. She is a talent and development expert. She's an author and frequent contributor to The Wall Street Journal, HBR, Business Insider, and Fast Company, Christy heads up performance practice at the Neuro-Leadership Institute, and I am very excited to have her as a guest on my show. Welcome, Christy.

Christy Pruitt-Haynes:

Thank you so much, Jeff. Glad to be here, and looking forward to this conversation.

Jeff Hunt:

You know, I would say Christy that people often think of this topic with a sense of hopelessness, but as I mentioned, my goal today is for us to give them some hope. What do you think about that?

Christy Pruitt-Haynes:

I completely agree, so many people dread it. And they think, oh, goodness, we're approaching this time of year, I have to have this random conversation that sometimes can feel very disjointed if organizations don't really think through on the best way to handle it. And at that moment, I think employees think I'm just going to sit here and grin and bear it, managers probably think the same thing. And unfortunately, both walk away without the clarity and sort of development moments that this could present I think if done properly.

Topic 1 Who or what inspired you the most in your career? (02:22)

Jeff Hunt:

Exactly. And so, before we jump into that, can you share with our listeners a thumbnail of your career journey? And also share with us if you can, who inspired you most along the way.

Christy Pruitt-Haynes:

Absolutely. So, I started my career longer ago than I care to admit, working in human resources. So, I actually started in recruiting, and then in benefits, did that for a while, and then transitioned to a generalist role, where I worked with everything from recruiting, benefits, development, training, diversity, all of those elements that really fall under the HR umbrella. So I had the opportunity to do that for a number of different organizations in various industries, including entertainment and security, things of that nature.

From there transition to doing consulting. So, first for myself, where I was able to do similar work focusing a lot on HR performance, particularly, as well as diversity, strategy, and leadership development with various different organizations. That's also when I started doing a great deal of speaking, which really goes hand in hand with consulting in so many ways. And now, most recently, I do very similar work for Neuro Leadership Institute.

As you mentioned, I'm the Global Head of our performance practice. So, within that we focus very much on the area we're talking about today, performance management, evaluations, making sure those conversations are really meaningful and impactful, and creating a solid throughline throughout the year for that employee, as opposed to that one time sort of check the box moment.

Jeff Hunt:

Fantastic. And was there any one person or people that inspired you?

Christy Pruitt-Haynes:

Yes. So, there have been a number of people I think, who have inspired me along the way, both personally and professionally. First, I will always give credit to my mom. I think it is largely because of her that I even entered HR. When I was going to college, I was very much undecided, as so many students are I vacillated between marketing and engineering and couldn't quite decide what I wanted to do.

So, I went to her and said, you know, what do you think I'm great at? And she paused for a moment and she said, well, you've always liked to talk a lot, you love knowing everything and you're great at keeping secrets. So, I said okay, let's figure out how to make a career out of that. Oddly enough, I found HR sort of at the center of that, when within human resources we work with everyone in an organization so I get to talk to and interact with everyone.

Oftentimes we do have to be the holder of many secrets for the organization. But then finally, it still gives me the ability to really sit in what I like to think of as sitting at the hub of the organization to help each area perform at its peak. So, I found a way to kind of infuse all of those random personal strengths and turn them into a career that I've absolutely loved.

Jeff Hunt:

I love that. And our moms usually know us better than we know ourselves.

Christy Pruitt-Haynes:

Absolutely yes, they absolutely do.

Topic 2. The evolution of Performance Management (05:24)

Jeff Hunt:

I want to have you share kind of an evolution of Performance Management for our listeners, just so they can understand how we got to where we are today. And I read recently, Christy that the first written records of performance reviews actually go back to around the 1880s.

And now there's probably some debate over this. And it's incredible, you think of 140 years of history, but for some companies, it feels like not much has changed since then. So, it's kind of amazing, but share with our listeners a picture of what this looks like, at least for the past, you know, 50, 60,70 years?

Christy Pruitt-Haynes:

Absolutely. So you're right. You know, for some organizations, unfortunately, I do think they're still doing the same processes that they did, 100 + years ago. But for most organizations, we have seen some trends sort of through the years. So back in the 50s, and 60s, we saw a lot of kind of traditional performance appraisal, it was very much based on this is your role, let's check the box, did you do this or did you not, there wasn't much focus on growth, it was just checking off if you accomplish certain things.

So again, you have to think about where we were as industries, oftentimes, most positions were based on production. So, it was very easy to say you produced 30 widgets, just like you were supposed, to check, you did what you needed to do. As we move to the 70s, we started seeing a big link between pay for performance.

So, there was a huge correlation between compensation and performance, which in some ways is good, but I think can still really steer us in the wrong direction, and infuse some bias in the process, if we aren't careful. From there, we really lead to what I call it sort of dark era, if you will, of performance management. And that's forced distribution ratings.

So, you saw managers saying, I need to have at least 10% of my workforce that I deem as a top performer, you know, 50 60%, that is sort of in the middle or average, and a certain percentage that are on pips are looking for ways to improve or potentially manage out the organization. What happens is you create a lot of infighting within your organization, everyone is competing to be one of those top performers, when in reality, you may have an entire team full of strong performers.

But because you've been forced into these very rigid buckets, and, and very rigid percentages, you're not able to acknowledge the contributions of everyone in a meaningful way. We then went to almost what I would call the polar opposite of that, of seeing a lot of organizations do away with ratings. So, you may not have seen the excellent, you know, good, etc., and instead start focusing more on some of those behaviors and habits that you want to see people really demonstrate every day.

And that's led us to what I think is really best practice right now. And that's the idea of continuous performance management, meaning, let's have these conversations throughout the year. This should not be something where you sit down with an employee one time at the beginning of your fiscal year, we all know we're only going to remember the last few weeks of performance in an accurate way.

So instead, with continuous performance management, there are a series of conversations that happen throughout the year feedback is something that is welcomed and asked for on an ongoing basis. And it's a two-way street of that conversation that focuses not only on giving feedback but on having some great check-in conversations. And also having those development conversations about where do you want to see your career grow? And how can we help you get there?

And so when those happen throughout the year, then we tend to see a much more engaged workforce and a much more productive and positive environment for everyone.

Jeff Hunt:

Fantastic. That makes so much more sense. So I have a definition, obviously, I run a continuous performance management software company. And one of the things that I'd like to actually talk about is, ironically, how technology is not the panacea. So you actually have to have process, disciplines, and training you have to have a cadence for human processes in addition to technology.

But I'd like to share a definition that we came up with at GoalSpan about continuous performance management and just have you reflect on this. The definition is near-term goal setting, bi-directional one-to-ones, and ongoing real-time feedback which is implemented with high flexibility and low formality or hierarchy. And I'm wondering what your thoughts are about that definition.

Christy Pruitt-Haynes:

I love that. I love that because you hit on so many of those very important and necessary moments. First, that near-term goal setting, we are all human. And there's only so much cognitive capacity that we have. So if goals are written where you need to accomplish this in a year or two years, we're simply not going to remember that and employees won't know where to really prioritize their activities.

So, having those shorter terms, those near term moments, where we're talking about what's the most important thing to do right now? What's the most important thing to accomplish, as we move towards this larger goal? It really helps us to focus on the progress people make throughout their time with an organization, instead of thinking they have to go from A to Z, automatically. You also talked about some of that one on one conversations. So having that as an ongoing dialogue.

This isn't just one-directional, we're just the manager telling the employee, here's what's good, here's what's great. It's both of them participating in that. And again, I think that's going to really increase that engagement, and really make it a meaningful, meaningful sort of check-in and ongoing feedback loop that hopefully will continue throughout their time with that organization. So I'm a fan of that definition.

Topic 3. Are all managers qualified to do performance reviews? (11:24)

Jeff Hunt:

Let's talk about one-to-one for a minute. Because it seems like in some organizations, certain managers are just not as competent in terms of having these types of meetings, there can be sensitivity, you know, it's interesting when you think about this type of meeting, because there are so many different dynamics, I may really like the person that I'm meeting with, or I may not like them that much. And then you have a situation where they may be a high performer or not be a high performer.

And you can mix these up. So what if I liked the person but they're a low performer? Or if I don't like the person, and they're a high performer? I guess I'd like to have you speak to organizations that know that certain managers, they're lacking competency in terms of these skills that are required, how should they address that issue? What can they do to sort of bolster their bench strength there?

Christy Pruitt-Haynes:

Perfect. I love that you asked that question, Jeff. So, the role of a manager and I'd love to start talking about that just a bit. The role of a manager, they have several components. First, it's going to be the technical parts of their jobs. So let's say they're in marketing, for example. So how well are they able to execute a marketing campaign or whatever that may be? But the other part that I argue is often more important is how are they able to lead and develop and engage with their team members.

And so often, we can see, a manager who's really strong on the technical side isn't as strong on the people side. And that's when the organization has the responsibility to help bolster to help train and teach them. How do I have these conversations? And how do I have them with mitigating or removing as much of the bias from the process as possible? You mentioned managers who really like one team member or another, I've always said within the workplace, that we love for people to like each other.

But that's not required, what's required is honesty and respect. So it's really going to be important in that situation, for the organization to help remind that people manager, it is your role to respect and to give transparent feedback to everyone, regardless of what you think about them as an individual. Whether or not you choose to go have a drink with them later, is irrelevant when we're talking about performance management.

And I think the other thing that organizations really need to help provide all of their people leaders are very clear definitions and understanding of what success looks like at this company. And that goes beyond just saying we want someone who can create 10 widgets, you know, obviously, that's going to be important. And we're always going to look for some of those productivity metrics if they exist for a certain role.

But the other thing that you want managers to really understand around success is, what are the behaviors that we want to see our people demonstrating on a daily basis? How do we want to see them engage with each other, and make sure that that feedback that you share addresses those issues just as much as the direct productivity issues? What we often find is when managers and employees are very clear on the behaviors and on habits that we want to see everyone demonstrate, then they're able to have a much more meaningful and well-rounded performance conversation.

Jeff Hunt:

That's so telling. And I would just add a footnote from our perspective, that the behavioral aspects absolutely have to be integrated and so do the corporate vision, mission, where they're going, and then you can truly get alignment around people because they understand where we're going and why that's such a compelling and inspiring place to go. And then how they individually fit into achieving those long-range objectives. And the sort of understanding of how we're going to live out these objectives in the workplace, what do we value? What is most important? And then we can engage with each other in much more of a trusting and meaningful way. Right?

Christy Pruitt-Haynes:

Absolutely. Absolutely. You know, it's interesting when you think about what success at any one organization looks like, a lot of that starts very much with their vision and their mission. So, when an employee can very clearly understand and articulate my job is x, and here is how this job contributes to the larger organizational goal. The analogy that I like to use quite often as a sports team, it's something most people can understand.

Within a sports team, say it's baseball, you're going to have a pitcher, you have someone who's the catcher, the outfielder, everybody's doing something different. But they all know they're working towards the same thing that's to win the game. They also hopefully know how it is they should go about doing it. Are we a team that really leans into stealing bases? Because that's sort of our competitive advantage?

So, we want to do more of that. So, when employees really understand what it is, we're trying to accomplish? The why are we doing it, which is that vision and mission point that you brought up, as well as the How should I get there? You can really put all of those together and build a very strong performance framework around that, that will help managers guide all of those critical conversations, and all of those development opportunities.

Topic 4. One-to-one meetings. The importance of giving and receiving quality feedback (16:47)

Jeff Hunt:

So I read a statistic recently, Christy, that employees who feel their voices are heard are 4.6 times more likely to feel empowered and perform better. And so, I love that, and what it speaks to is the importance of giving and receiving quality feedback. So, this is sort of a good segue to the quality of these one-to-one meetings, you know, we've done the training, but what are the best methods for giving and receiving quality feedback?

Christy Pruitt-Haynes:

I'm so glad you asked, and you're absolutely right. If I feel as though my immediate supervisor in the organization at large, really does care about what it is, I have to say they want to hear my opinion, and they're actively reaching out for that, then I am going to automatically lean in more, I'm going to automatically strive to produce at a higher level. So when we think about those feedback conversations, one of the best ways to make them as impactful as possible is to make them both specific and asked for.

So for example, a manager or anyone can come up to you just randomly and say, Hey, Christy, you know, I really don't like the dress you're wearing. There isn't much I can do about that I didn't ask for that feedback, so, chances are I'm going to be really defensive about it. And I am not in a frame of mind to really process that. So instead, if I were to go to you and say, Hey, Jeff, what do you think about this outfit? Is this going to work to be on camera?

Where you can then give me specific feedback around what it is it's going to be most impactful for me to improve, then it's going to lead to a higher quality conversation. So the first thing would be for employees to help say, these are some of the things I would love for you to share your opinion about. So managers can really go in and look for those specific areas. The other thing is when it can become the habit of the organization for everyone to ask for feedback.

What that really does, feedback is one of the most stressful moments both for the giver and receiver, the person receiving it is assuming something negative is coming. So, they're automatically defensive. And the person giving it is afraid they're going to hurt someone's feelings. So they aren't as transparent. But again, if I can ask you for that, it's going to be a much more impactful and meaningful conversation, everybody's threat level is going to go down.

And then each person can really hone in on what's being shared, as opposed to first feeling like I have to defend myself at this moment. So, creating that culture of asking for feedback is so impactful. And also being as specific as you can about this is the kind of feedback that would be most helpful to me at this moment. I think when you can have those two things, it's going to make those conversations that much easier, and that much more meaningful.

Jeff Hunt:

That's so impactful. And it's such a simple strategy as well. Just ask, and it also seems applicable in the reverse. For instance, let's say I noticed one of my direct reports is really struggling in a key area. If I go to that person and I immediately provide unsolicited feedback, I would imagine what you said is also true. They're going to be potentially defensive.

They're going to be thinking about all the ways they haven't been praised or recognized all the things they're doing that maybe haven't been seen. But if I go to that employee and I say, John, I've noticed something that could be helpful, and I'm wondering if I could provide some feedback. I simply ask them a question. And now they we give them the opportunity, and guess what, 99.9% of the time, they're gonna say yes, please share what you have, right?

Christy Pruitt-Haynes:

Absolutely. asking for permission is a great way again, to lower that threat level. Because the truth is, and you're right, the vast majority of the time, they're gonna say, Oh, absolutely, yes, share that feedback. But it's possible that they may say, I want to hear it, but right now I am in the middle of preparing for this big presentation.

So, if that's what they're doing, then that's where their mind is, and you telling them something, that's on a different topic can pull them away. So, they can easily say, I absolutely want to hear it. But can we have a conversation at you know, two o'clock tomorrow, I've got a good chunk of time to talk to them, that, again, puts them in a place where they feel a bit of autonomy, they have some control over whether or not they're going to hear and they control when they hear it?

So that automatically lowers that threat level. Autonomy is one of the dimensions of the scarf, which is something the Neuro Leadership Institute talks about a great deal to help lower threat levels in these conversations. So asking for that permission makes it a much easier dialogue for everyone to be a part of.

Jeff Hunt:

Sure. And I think that it's important to recognize the importance of the relational connection as well, because, you know, it's really interesting when you were reflecting back through the evolution of performance management. And we got into the 80s. And it was this forced ranking, it was really the GE way, you know, Jack Ma, said, everybody on the tops going up and the bottom 10% is going out. And yet it feels like what that did is had a counter effect on relational connection, it created silos. And people didn't have the important levels of sort of compassion and empathy between each other that creates trust that allows for these meaningful conversations, wouldn't you say?

Christy Pruitt-Haynes:

Absolutely. And right now, I would argue that that is more important than probably any other time in modern history. We all have so much going on both professionally and personally, just when we think about the time that we're in, the pandemic has affected everybody in so many ways. So empathy has become one of those things that we absolutely need. So quite often, those connections, those relationships really matter, and that allows an employee to hear what someone has to say that much more.

There's an old saying something along the lines of, I don't care what you think until I think that you care. So, someone just coming up and saying, you know, someone who you know, doesn't have your best interest at heart and you feel as though they don't, again, you're going to reject the feedback that they have to share, because the first thing you're thinking is, well, you didn't like me anyway.

So another sort of tool that all managers need in that toolkit is really building up their empathy, really developing and knowing how to create those connections with everyone with all of their employees. So, it doesn't become about favoritism. It doesn't become about who am I closer to. And instead, it's a situation where everyone has enough of that connection, that you can have those meaningful and quality conversations.

Topic 5. Numerical Ratings. Do they still work? How do we move away from them? (23:30)

Jeff Hunt:

That's great. So let's shift and talk briefly about numerical ratings. Because in our tool, we have options for using those and not and we usually advise clients, that if you can move away from numeric ratings, it's helpful. But what are some of the inherent problems with numeric ratings?

Christy Pruitt-Haynes:

So, and again, we completely agree, I think if you can move away from it, it's great. Some of the problems are first, scales are very subjective. So when I may write someone as a, say, a five, you may write them as a four, it's often difficult unless it is a purely sort of production-related scale. So, anything short of that is going to be subjective. So, you're now opening yourself up to the possibility of bias. It could be one of those scenarios where the manager likes this person.

So, it just so happens that their rating is a little bit higher. So, there's the potential for some bias there that is oftentimes unintentional but still can be very impactful. The other thing is, that people have preconceived notions about what certain numbers mean. So for some people, you know, so your scale is one to five, someone may think, well, three is average. That's great. So if someone should be happy if they're rated at three, someone else, though, is coming in with the understanding.

Well, a three is like getting a C and who wanted to get a C in school, I always wanted A's, right? So again, each of us is going to value these numbers or whatever that rating system is a little bit different. At least, that notion of subjectivity and that notion of everyone having slightly different criteria just opens it up to not having an apples-to-apples comparison. And again, not providing something that's a really quality metric.

It's much better to say to an employee, the kinds of behaviors we're looking for this or the goal that we as an organization are working towards, is this, so let's talk about some of those things you can do to move us there, as opposed to an arbitrary number that may or may not really hold a strong meaning.

Jeff Hunt:

And what's your counsel or advice for organizations that are wanting to eliminate numerical ratings, but aren't really sure what to do what to replace that with?

Christy Pruitt-Haynes:

Yes. So, first, be very, very thoughtful about how you implement that change. Regardless of what you move towards, this is a moment where change management is really going to be your best friend, over-communicate to everyone talk about why you're making the change, and talk about what the new shift is going to be. And then talk about it again, and again, because you want everyone to understand the why behind that change and the benefits that are going to come out of it.

The next thing is, you know, some of the things that we've talked about before, really look at the organization's goals, and move towards a system that's going to help demonstrate what behaviors what skills, what things, what traits are going to move us closer to those. So, helps draw that connection between what employees a does and what the organization is trying to accomplish. That's when you know, you have a really strong system in place.

And then finally, make sure that you again, it's a series of conversations that all connect, so whatever it is, you move towards, have feedback on that, that you give out throughout the year, have checked in and kind of goals that are structured that support that system, so it doesn't feel random. So often, we may evaluate one thing, but then on Monday through Friday, we're talking about something else. So, make sure that all of those conversations really connect and link together.

Jeff Hunt:

So one more question before we switch to some lightning-round questions. One of the things that comes up a lot is the decoupling of the annual review with merit increases. And so should organizations decouple those two, and if so, what should replace them?

Christy Pruitt-Haynes:

I think they should be decoupled. And I realize there are some organizations that aren't able to do that. And there are ways to manage it if that's the decision. But when you can pull those apart, you're able to again, really focus on the true development, the true goal setting, quite often what can happen is if an employee goes into their manager's office, and the manager says, you're getting a, 5% 2% 10%, raise whatever that number is, that employee isn't going to hear what say it after that they're focused on the dollars and cents at that moment.

So instead, we want a performance management system that really stresses and encourages the type of desired performance, the desired behaviors, and habits that we want to see. And we want compensation that acknowledges the level of that position, the skills necessary to be successful, that sort of thing. And that doesn't always have a direct sort of one-to-one correlation with some of the other things that you're going to talk about in a performance management system.

But in order to do that, one of the things all companies have to keep in mind is, first, it has to start with a compensation system that is fair and equitable to everyone. And once you have that, then you can layer on other things that help to support the overall mission of that company.

Topic 6. Lightning-round questions (28:42)

Jeff Hunt:

All right, Christy, let's shift into some lightning-round questions. My first one for you is what are you most grateful for?

Christy Pruitt-Haynes:

I am most grateful for my family, I have to say family and friends because I have friends that are you know, sort of that chosen family, but the people who I am surrounded by on a daily basis, they keep me going and they are my joy.

Jeff Hunt:

Nice. What is the most difficult leadership lesson you've learned over your career?

Christy Pruitt-Haynes:

Not letting anything get my supervisor by surprise, I think especially early in our career, we all have a tendency and a desire to cover up any mistakes that we make. And what I've learned is it is much better to own up to those on the front end. So you can then work together to figure out how to mitigate or how navigate out of that situation. And when you can go into it with almost the same mentality that you would have with a young child.

Whatever is going on, I went on prepared to help you if you're upfront about it. So instead of looking at some of those mistakes that we as employees make and looking at the method, downside, or something that we want to cover, embrace those and know that it's a learning opportunity lean into them because that ultimately is going to lead to a much stronger performance down the road.

Jeff Hunt:

Who's one person you would interview if you could living or not?

Christy Pruitt-Haynes:

Great question! I have to think of Shonda Rhimes. So, she's the writer and creator, of so many of my favorite television shows, she made the decision that so many people probably wouldn't make to leave ABC, which people sort of assumed is kind of the quintessential career point for a writer and producer, and moved over to Netflix, and did so for reason that a lot of people question, but I actually applaud. So I would love to sit down and have a glass of wine with her and just pick her brain a bit.

Jeff Hunt:

No doubt. It sounds like she was living out her core values.

Christy Pruitt-Haynes:

She was, she absolutely was. And I think people who are able to do that in a really meaningful way, I find are some of the most inspirational people out there.

Jeff Hunt:

Me too, for sure. Do you have a top book recommendation? Are there any books that you've read that you would highly recommend?

Christy Pruitt-Haynes:

Oh, goodness, yes. So now to have one come to mind quickly. So, the name is escaping me. It's conversations. It's not quality conversation.

Jeff Hunt:

Fierce Conversations?

Christy Pruitt-Haynes:

Yes. Thank you. That's a wonderful book. So, I think that is one that I would definitely recommend. And then other than that, any book that brings you joy, you know, I think we can all get so bogged down in our professional lives. I think everyone needs something that's just going to make them laugh for no reason. So, I would, I would also always add something that would just make you laugh.

Jeff Hunt:

What's the best piece of advice you've ever received?

Christy Pruitt-Haynes:

The best piece of advice, and I received it through a series of conversations. And then I distilled it all into one sort of quote that I now try and live by every day. But it's “The goal is not to think and act alike, but to think and act together”. So that came from, again, a series of conversations that I've had with so many just incredibly intelligent people.

But what it reminds me of is, collaboration is always going to be much stronger than the competition. But it also reminds me that diverse teams, so having people that can think and act together, but not necessarily always have the exact same ideas is going to lead to a much, much stronger unit. So, I think that's the quote that I sort of hold on to, and kind of center all of my decisions around.

Jeff Hunt:

That's such a great quote and piece of advice. And it underscores also the statistics around diverse teams outperforming homogenous teams, right?

Christy Pruitt-Haynes:

Exactly, exactly. It really does. And it's such a strong fact that so many people don't always assume would be the case. But it very much is so yes, I again, I infuse that in every day of my work life.

Jeff Hunt:
Christy as we wrap up, what's the single most important takeaway that you'd like to leave with our listeners from our talk?

Christy Pruitt-Haynes:

I think the most important thing is to really think about and build out these conversation moments throughout the year. Performance management is not a one-and-done. It's not an annual conversation where you sit down with someone for 10 or 15 minutes. But instead, it is a series of true conversations that build on each other and have a very consistent throughline.

So, make sure that these conversations are meaningful, that they're impactful, that they underscore the right things, and that they really build on that notion of connection because that's when I think they're going to be much more implementable for each of the parties.

Jeff Hunt:

And how can people find you very quickly just say a little bit about the neuro Leadership Institute?

Christy Pruitt-Haynes:

Absolutely, so Neuro Leadership Institute, we are neuroleadership.com. We are a wonderful organization that focuses on using science to make organizations more human. And we really work to have a change in weeks, not years. So, so many organizations are trying to constantly improve and we help create frameworks, whether it's through consulting or some of our pre-packaged solutions that really help organizations become who it is they want to be.

So please check out neuroleadership.com online, you'll find me on the website, as well as all of the phenomenal scientists, consultants, facilitators and just brilliant minds that we work with to help make so many of the Fortune 100 organizations as well as you know, other companies around the world much stronger.

Jeff Hunt:

Christy, thank you so much for bringing all this wisdom to the Human Capital podcast today.

Christy Pruitt-Haynes:

Yes, you are absolutely welcome, Jeff. Thanks again for having me.


Outro(34:41)

Closing music jingle/sound effects

Jeff Hunt:

Thanks for listening to the show this week. We release new episodes every other Tuesday. Let me know what you thought of this episode by emailing humancapitalgoalspan.com. Human capital is produced by GoalSpan. Subscribe, wherever you get your podcasts. And please share this podcast with your colleagues, team, or friends. Thanks for being human kind.

SUMMARY KEYWORDS

organizations, conversations, performance management, people, employee, managers, feedback, absolutely, christy, talk, meaningful, performance, impactful, ratings, moment, check, create, career, person, infuse

SPEAKERS

Jeff Hunt, Christy Pruitt-Haynes

Human Capital — 48. Performance Management Expert
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